ATOMIC CINEMA – DR. STRANGELOVE’ x ‘THE BOMB’

Berlin Film Society & Berliner Union Film
present

Cult classic ‘DR. STRANGELOVE’ (1964) + the mesmerizing ‘THE BOMB’ (2017)
-Open Air Cinema-

Berlin Film Society Berliner Union Film invites you to a double-feature event combining Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb’ (1964) with the highly-acclaimed, avant-garde film, ‘the bomb’ (2017), which premiered earlier this year at the Berlinale and Tribeca Film Festival.

In 1964, Stanley Kubrick dared to make a film about what could happen if the wrong person pushed the wrong button. In 2017 – over 50 years later – Kubrick’s subversive masterpiece is proving to be a prophecy disguised as farce. As the world descends deeper into madness and the threat of nuclear war once again becomes a possibility at the push of a button, a stunning and compelling new documentary immerses us into the strange and unsettling world of the nuclear weapon: ‘the bomb’ (2017).

This unique event presents an opportunity to witness the troubling history of the nuclear bomb by juxtaposing the jet-black satire of Kubrick’s cult film with the mesmerizing cinematic experience of ‘the bomb’.

★ ABOUT DR. STRANGELOVE ★

An insane general triggers a path to nuclear holocaust that a war room full of politicians and generals frantically try to stop. Dr. Strangelove’s jet-black satire and a host of superb comic performances have kept the film fresh and entertaining, especially as the issues have become increasingly more timely.

When Dr. Strangelove was released in 1964, its plot was criticized for being impossible, implausible, a Hollywood fiction. But Stanley Kubrick was a determined and obsessive researcher for all of his films. Kubrick read everything he could about American nuclear strategy, interviewed specialists in the field, and worked closely with Peter George, a former Royal Air Force officer, on the script for Strangelove.

Half a century later, we now know that the story created by Kubrick and George gives a more accurate depiction of how America’s nuclear weapons were actually managed at the time than anything published in the mainstream press. What happens in the film could, indeed, have happened in real life—a terrifying thought. Finding improbable hilarity in nearly every unimaginable scenario, ‘Dr. Strangelove’ is a subversive masterpiece that officially announced Kubrick as an unparalleled stylist and pitch-black ironist.

★ ABOUT THE BOMB ★

Today, there are still roughly 15,000 nuclear weapons in the world. About two dozen of them are stored at an air base in southwestern Germany. And yet most people never think about these machines that can cause megadeath.

‘The Bomb’ is an experimental, music-driven film. It reminds you that nuclear weapons are still out there ready to be used, shows their perverse appeal, and without a plot or narration or any solemn preaching gives you an intense, visceral sense of the most dangerous technology ever invented.

‘the bomb’ was produced and conceived by Smriti Keshari (Food Chains) and Eric Schlosser (Command and Control, Fast Food Nation, Food, Inc.). The film was co-directed by Kevin Ford (Three Days, By the River), Keshari & Schlosser, with art direction by Stanley Donwood (Radiohead) and animation by The Kingdom of Ludd. The Acid composed the soundtrack.

‘the bomb’ places the viewer in the middle of the story of nuclear weapons – the most dangerous machines ever built – from the Trinity Test in 1945 to the current state of nuclear weapons in 2016.

★ EVENT DETAILS ★

Friday 1 September
€13 // €11 students
(includes booking fee + welcome treats and one drink)
Adults only
Facebook Event 
Book ticket online via Eventbrite here (link will be published soon)

20:00 Doors Open
20:30 ‘Dr. Strangelove’ OmU
22:15 ‘the bomb’ OV

LOCATION: 
Berliner Union Film
Oberlandstraße 26-35
12099 Berlin

★ WITH THANKS TO OUR PARTNERS ★
Berliner Union Film
Pilsner Urquell
Wildcorn
natsu Foods

Join us September 1 for the double bill screening of cult classic 'Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb' (1964) and the mesmerizing 'the bomb' (2017).